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. but on friday an asteroid is going to come really close to earth. but as carl azuz explains nasa says there's nothing to worry about. asteroid 2012 da14 is about half the size of a football field, and it's headed right for us, or right near us, but before you start worrying about this. >> it's a meteor shower. >> reporter: know that nasa says this: >> the close approach of this object 2012 da14 on february 15th in nothing to worry about. its orbit is very well known, we know exactly where it's going to go, and it cannot heat the earth. >> reporter: with concerns about the end of the world put to rest, lets check out some science on this bad boy. first of, the asteroid is cruising along its 17,455 miles per hour. that's fast. but not as fast as rockets have to go in order to escape earth gravity and get in the space. speaking of gravity, it's going to give the asteroid a little extra pull as it passes by. so, as this thing is closer to earth, it's actually going to get faster. just how close is da14 going to get when it passes by on february 15th? more than 17,000 miles away from the planet.
, congress directed the federal agencies including the faa and nasa collaborating in accelerating the integration of uas into the national air space. the faa modernization and reform act of 2012 contains provisions designed to promote and facilitate the use of civilian unmanned aircraft. we, on the subcommittee, know that you've been working hard and have made progress towards meeting the prescribed objectives, but we also know that there are many unresolved issues, both technologically and regulatorily. again, i go to the goal today to have the research to overcome technology issues and mitigate risk involved with uas integration into the national air space system. we're particularly interested in hearing about any advances towards eliminating as a as a vulnerabilities. the agreements on technological standards and the "washington post" reported nine american uas crashes occurred near civilian airports overseas as a result of pilot ere -- error. there's poor coordination with air traffic controllers. in august 2010, the "new york times" reported that a navy uas violated air space
? deflected in tehran or something like that? >> andrea: doesn't it make you nervous that nasa is being dismantled by the administration? how are we supposed to know when they are coming? >> bob: nasa was not who intercepted this. it was department of defense. it was not nasa. >> andrea: right. nasa doesn't have anything to do with space. >> bob: i don't think the republicans. this is a waste of time. if it hits your house, well -- this is not hateful. i don't want it to hit your house. if it hits the russians, too bad, too. any human being, too bad. with the exception of a few i can think of. >> eric: this is irrelevant. [ overtalk ] bronc you upset about that? >> eric: no. everything is fine. can we point out the weekend away that the department of homeland security spent the money on, they spent money on $40 billion in various projects like in arizona $90,000 to fund and install video monitoring system for security cameras in chicago. guess what happened? never put security camera up? >> andrea: what is going on? >> dana: this is strange. i understand a training video for a lot of th
in the integration. last year congress directed the federal agent fees, including the faa and nasa collaborated in accelerating integration into the national airspace. the faa modernization and reform act of 2012 can tames provision designed to promote and facilitate use of civilian unmanned aircraft. we have a subcommittee know you've been working hard and it made progress towards meeting the prescribed object days, but we also know there are many unresolved issues, both technologically and regulatory lead. again, our goal today is to better understand the research underway to overcome technological issues and mitigate risk involved with uas integration into the national airspace system. we are particularly interested in hearing about any advances towards eliminating vulnerabilities in command and control communications. new capabilities in and agreements on technological standards. the "washington post" recently reported that he sent american crashes occurred near civilian airports overseas as a result of pilot error. mechanical failure, poor coordination of air traffic controllers. in august
as a large asteroid makes it very close trip pass the art. these are nasa radar images and illustrations of * d a 14. the 150 m diameter rocks is going to pass so close to earth, that it will be even closer than some satellites! nasa says that it will be the best opportunity " never " to monitor a near miss by an object so large, and learn more about astroid past predictions. no need to worry, though, nasa scientists say that it will definitely not hit the globe. astronomers say and ask for this size would cause an expulsion equivalent to 82 and a half megaton bomb. we will be right back. >> here are the afternoon highs. is going to be a nice day. it will be 69 degrees impala alto. fairfield will be popping out at 70 degrees. bridgman will be at 67 degrees. it will be 71 degrees for santa rosa. your kron 47 day around the bay highlights that warmer weather will be for the weekend and we may see some light rain as we head into next tuesday and wednesday. >> we're not tracking any hot spots but here is your bridge to check. the drive times are still from 18 to 20 minutes. the san mateo bri
to make a close fly by of planet earth. but nasa says there's no chance the 150-foot astroid will hit us. at the closest point it will be 17,000 miles from earth, and that's closer than weather and tv satellites that are in orbit. we're giving you mixed messages there. we're saying it's not far, but it's closer than weather and tv satellites. okay. greg was in here, and i was happy to hear his explanation of things. >> he says we don't have to worry about it. in the meantime, do we have to worry about the weather? here's tucker barnes with the answer. >>> potentially so. thank you very much. not this morning. lots of sunshine. cool start to the day. later this afternoon, rain showers move in for the evening commute and might transition to snow later tonight. a lot going on weather-wise. 37 now at reagan national. 34 this morning dulles. bwi marshall 33 degrees. make sure the kids are bundled up. we're not concerned with rain and/or snow the first half of the day. satellite radar, generally sunny skies the first half of your day. clouds will quickly increase. late this afternoon, see the
. bill: according to nasa, 100 tons of meet toors of gravel and dust hit the atmosphere and the earth every single day. the smaller strikes what we saw in russia happen ten times a year. that's new. scientists believe a strike by a meteor six miles across may have been responsible for extinction of the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. in case you're wondering on a friday have something to do over the weekend you mentioned the asteroid talking about past several days. they say there is no connection between that and this meteor. we'll talk to scientists throughout the morning. heather: a lot of experts. bill: meantime, six minutes past, the nightmare is finally over. what a slow crawl this was. thousands of passengers cheering the end of a cruise ship horror scene. touching land and kissing it like the pope. the carnival cruise triumph docking last night in mobile after putting what passengers through what they call disgusting conditions. now they say they are just happy to be home. who can blame them. >> i feel great to be off the ship and just being on land and, i get to see my family
nervous now that nasa is beingng dismantled by this administration? how are we supposed to know -- >> i thought nasa was supposed to do outreach to the muslim community. >> oh, right. >> it was the department of defense. >> no. >> it was not nasa. >> you're right. does -- doesn't have anything to do with space, bob. >> no, no. i think it's waste of time.is asteroid is going to come, what is it going to do? if it hits your house, well, it's a sad thing. i don't want it to hit your house or anybody. if it. hits the russians, that's too bad, too. if it hits any human, it's toong bad. with the exception of a few i could thinkep of. >> that's irrelevant right now. >> therec: are 1,000 people wha? >> are you upset about this? >> no. can we point out that video, that weekend away that the department of homeland security spent all that money on, they also spent money, somewhere around $40 billion over the last ten years on various projects like in arizona where these 90na grand to fund and install video monitoring systems at the peoria sports complex to put securityer cameras in chicago and the
this afternoon around 2:25 eastern. nasa didn't know about the astroid until a year ago when an amateur astronomer just happened to spot it in our skies. but it seems a remote part of russia did get a visitor from space. at least one meteorite streaked across the sky this morning triggering powerful shockwaves. witnesses say the noise set off car alarms and broke windows and damaged a factory. at least 250 people were hurt, mostly cuts from broken glass. thousands of russian troops were put on alert. >> apparently according to the latest information we have, 20,000 first responders are being sent to the scene, three aircraft surveying the damage from the scene. again, all those folks injured from the broken glass of all the stuff that shattered during the collision. >> and it's cold there, so the people with shattered windows are in the freezing cold. so a lot going on. >>> now let's check our weather. mountain snow in the central rockies. showers from tennessee to southern illinois. heavy rain from orlando southward. snow around the great lakes and northern new england. >>> mostly 50s
's surprising is nasa didn't even see it. we'll tell you why, coming up next right here on "world news now." >>> "world news now" weather brought to you by consumer cellular. have given way to sleeping. tossing and turning where sleepless nights yield to restful sleep. and lunesta®(eszopiclone) can help you get there. like it has for so many people before. when taking lunesta, don't drive or operate machinery until you feel fully awake. walking, eating, driving, or engaging in other activities while asleep, without remembering it the next day, have been reported. lunesta should not be taken together with alcohol. abnormal behaviors may include aggressiveness, agitation, hallucinations, or confusion. in depressed patients, worsening of depression, including risk of suicide, may occur. alcohol may increase these risks. allergic reactions such as tongue or throat swelling occur rarely and may be fatal. side effects may include unpleasant taste, headache, dizziness, and morning drowsiness. ask your doctor if lunesta is right for you. then find out how to get lunesta for as low as fifteen doll
of the meteorite's powerful landing. right now nasa is keeping close watch over an asteroid as it hurdles about 17,000 miles above the earth's surface. a record-setting approach near our planet and apparently it's under 50 feet wide. tom costello joins me from the newsroom. tom, what do we know so far about what happened in russia? >> it was absolutely unbelievable. it was spectacular. what's kind of interesting here is so many people in russia these days have these little go pro cameras because they want to capture when they're hit in a traffic accident or official corruption. we have many views of this asteroid traveling at 33,000 miles per hour slamming into the earth's atmosphere above southwestern russia. this happened at 9:15 this morning. this town has a million people in it. thankfully most of the debris actually fell outside of the town, but it blew out the windows in nearly every single building and in many, many homes, and keep in mind, these are soviet era designs, so they're not terribly well built. a short time ago i talked to a canadian who was living there in that particular part o
yesterday. nasa calls this a once in a century event. a meteor, pretty sizeable one, as a matter of fact, screamed out of the sky and slammed to earth. more than 1,000 people were hurt and thousands of buildings damaged. cnn's phil black is in russia. he hit the road today, trying to find the spot where the meteor landed. >> are we're walking on a frozen lake. it's about a 90-minute drive west. we're here because locals say a big fragment from the meteor punched through the ice. and is now sitting at the bottom of the lake. [ speaking in russian ] >> that was a very firm no. these police officers said it is prohibited for us to be here, to shoot video here, to try and walk any further. if if part of that meet orrite came down there, where those vehicles are, as locals say it did, the russian authorities don't want us or anyone else to see it. the meteor's final descent through the atmosphere was seen by people all across this region. at this school, students came outside to look at the trail of smoke it left in the sky. one student captured the moment on his phone. what were you thinking
building, but nasa says not to worry, it will not hit the earth. the asteroid will come as close as 17,000 miles, that's within the orbit of more than 100 telecommunication and weather satellites. >>> so as we were getting pom barded with asteroids on this day, hey, happy friday. >> right. >> maybe we'll see you tomorrow, maybe we won't. i'm just kidding. >> don't scare anybody. don't scare anyone. >> i'm he a just kidding. >> can't plan for that. >> no, you can't plan for that. >> we'll talk more about that coming up in about an hour for now. greg, our sky guy will be here. >> for tony tucker, we're going to talk about all this, so it should be interesting. let's talk about weather, we got a lot going on, temperatures in the 30s, kids get on the bus stop, nice and dry for the first half of your day. we will see some showers move in late this afternoon along with some milder temperatures. we'll be in the 50s later for your friday. 37 right now in washington, 30 this morning in boston, it's got a snow pack up there, 30 in chicago and, let's see, 28 in columbus. up ahead of -- we got a
: how much warning do we get? >> nasa tracks these things. they're able to track 90% of the asteroids that could come close to us. but in this case, there was really no warning. people don't know what's going on. >> brian: i remember in the video game, you could shoot an asteroid out of the sky. i know in armageddon, in the movies, bruce willis and ben affleck were able to -- who else was in that? were able to stop it. is that what we're going to have to do at some point? >> nasa does track these things and they have the capability to stop them before they come close to earth. >> brian: lasers? >> all sorts of things. >> steve: there has been a nasa plan to send some sort of ship onto an asteroid, but once again, the asteroid that's going to come between us and some of our satellites later today, that's going to be far away, right? >> it's relatively close. the closest they've come in centuries. so that's why people are a little nervous. but no, it's not going to hit us. >> alisyn: let us know if there is ever one coming, all right? >> brian: even if we're in sports or in an interview
. and the meteorite that crashed into russia, why nasa thought it was bigger and badder than we first thought. >> a flash of light. >> just says after a huge meteorite explodes over russia injuring more than a thousand people there's word of another big fireball, this one streaking above california. trace gallagher live on the west coast with more, trace? >> reporter: they tell us that meteors are rare, but they're whipping around us. this person was driving 280 one of the areas around the bay area, a bright flash of blue light streak across. it's kind of hard to see the color on the video, but witnesses say this thing was a very bright blue and maybe it's just because of what happened in russia that we're watching the skies a little closer, but experts say this likely also could have been a meteor or a meteorite, but there were no reports of it exploding and no reports of it hitting anything, unlike in russia where this thing happened on friday and now, nasa is saying that it was bigger, faster and stronger than they thought instead of 50 feet, it was 55 feet. instead of 33,000 miles per ho
scientists can see cosmic rocks coming our way, doing something about it is the tricky part. in theory, nasa would be able to knock a threatening incoming asteroid off orbit so it misses earth. but there's very little precedent for that. the only thing that comes close was a 2005 mission where nasa steered a probe about the size of a coffee table into an oncoming docket, a project known as -- comet, a prooj knoject kn "deep comet." >> with the they're tess should work fine, certainly there would be details in launching a massive object into space, making sure we guide it correctly so it will hit the right spot on the asteroid to knock it appropriately off-course. >> reporter: scientists say these events, the meteor in russia and the asteroid's close call, should be a wake-up call. if the asteroid instead of missing earth had impacted, say, washington, d.c., it would have been devastating. >> if it's dense enough and could hit the earth intact, the impact crater itself would not be that big. but the effects from the shockwave and the heat from impact would be enough to basically wipe out ever
? >> nasa has a program to search for these objects and we've done a good job at finding the large ones. we put the priority on finding the large one first. the one that hit on friday was really a tiny asteroid, pretty small. >> anna: it's wild that this tiny one caused this much damage. you say mostly what you're looking for are the ones that are 400 feet in size and up, right? >> yes. a city block and larger. those are ones that would reach the surface. the one that hit over russia was broken up by the atmosphere. so there was only the damage from the shock wave. the larger ones, if they reach the surface in one piece, can cause great damage. >> peter: when you talk about the larger ones, what are we talking about? something as big as a kilometer? do those exist? >> oh, yes. oh, yes. and that's about a half mile. nasa has done a good job of finding 95% of those ones. the idea is to find them many, many years before they could hit the earth and calculate when and where the hazard is and if there is a hazard sometime in the future, then we could possibly do something about it. >> steve: now
in the tracking? >> the good thing is that nasa and other agencies have been diligent about tracking this asteroid for some time now, so they have very good data on what the orbital pass of this is, and they can tell within a very few hundred feet or so, maybe a few hundred miles, how close this is to earth, and they know for sure that it won't come any closer than 17,150. that's pretty good. it's great they do that because they can look at other potentials like this too. >> we can be that accurate about its size and its pass of the earth, but let's get to this $200 billion number about what its cost would be worth. how do we get to that number? how do we put a price tag on this asteroid? >> well, you know, we could look at the composition ofas resides and figure out what their value is according to their mineral worth. if we could actually mine them and, of course, that's another story altogether, but when we think about the kind of minerals that we find there, some of them very rare ones that we need here on earth or that we use quite extentively here on earth, and we have somewhat limited suppl
information about the meteor that exploded on friday. nasa says the meteor was bigger than originally thought. they say the fire ball was 55 feet wide and weighed about 10,000 tons. it was traveling at 40,000 miles per hour when it exploded over siberia. >>> and another milestone for michael jordan. the basketball legend turns 50 today. happy birthday, m.j. >>> that was the pope this morning speaking from his window at the vatican while thousands of people gathered at st. peteers square. this is the pope's second to last sunday before retirement. the pope announced last week he is stepping down by the end of the month. anne thompson with more ont that. >> reporter: more than 50,000 people came to hear the pope. that is double the size of last week's crowd. he spoke to them in six different languages thanking them for their prayers and support and added in his native german that these were difficult days and the crowd in turn responded with respect and affection. in rome where there is no shortage of must-see attractions suddenly elderly pope benedict is number one on everyone's list. today he
aviation, nasa, and the government accountability office. >> i think women themselves and many cases were interested in politics but had no vehicle to express that in their own lives so they were attracted to men who were going to become politically attractive or were already politically active it. >> i think i find them intriguing. half of them precisely because they are so obscure historical. half of these women probably would be almost totally unrecognizable to most men and women on the street. >> this season -- c-span deviate's its series, "first lady's." and exploring the lives of the women who served as first ladies from martha washington to michelle obama. season one begins at 9:00 eastern and pacific on that c- span, suspend radio, and c- span.org. >> president obama proposed working with states to provide -- he went to georgia which has statewide prekindergarten. this is 16 minutes. [applause] >> hello, everybody. it is great to be in georgia. i cannot imagine a more romantic way to spend valentine's day than with all of you and all the press here. michele says hello. she made me
died off. dr. collins and his team will have been frozen for three years. nasa, we just went through the 10th anniversary of the challenger explosion. those astronauts that sit on that rocket, those and now in the future, if you have a nasa facility in your district and they sit on that rocket to go up, they froze for three years. firefighters out in the west when the storms come this summer and they are coming, the firefighters you call on them and beg them to come in and fight. and the weather service, those of you from florida and the tornado area and hurricanes area, the weathermen stay around the clockworking, frozen for three years. border patrol, brian terry, the people that work with him that are on the border where gangs, violent gangs coming across the border, brosen. for three -- frozen for three years. d.e.a. and others. the doctors out at walter reed, if you go out and visit walter reed or go visit your v.a. hospital, the doctors and the nurses that are working with the wounded warriors, people who have lost their limbs in afghanistan and iraq, frozen for three years. wi
history have combined to discover. so it will do that every month. >> watch more on former nasa astronaut ed lew and his urgent mission to save planet earth. this sunday on "the next list." ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] what's the point of an epa estimated 42 miles per gallon if the miles aren't interesting? the lexus ct hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. good afternoon. chase sapphire. (push button tone) this is stacy from springfield. oh whoa. hello? yes. i didn't realize i'd be talking to an actual person. you don't need to press "0," i'm here. reach a person, not a prompt whenever you call chase sapphire. why should saturday night have all the fun? get two times the points on dining in restaurants, with chase sapphire preferred. >>> welcome back to "starting point." a quick look at some of the top stories this morning. a critical court date this afternoon for george zimmerman, the man accused of killing florida teen trayvon martin. a judge will decide whether to move ahead with a stand your ground hearing in april. if zimmerman's attorneys are successful there and prove he ha
, a distance that could be cleared in just about 15 minutes. don't get too worried. nasa says the odds of the asteroid hitting the earth are quite low. >>> a big announcement in the business world this morning, u.s. airways and american airlines merging. the new mega carrier will use the american name and be the largest airline in the world. alison kosik is tracking the story and of course all we care about is how this will flekt ticket prices. >> reporter: i hear you. that's what we're all thinking about. we're not going to necessarily see the ticket prices spike when you go to make your airline ticket tomorrow or the next day because mergers don't necessarily cause these spikes in airline fares. historically you look, fares don't go up because mergers happen. in fact, when you adjust these fares for inflation, they've actually been falling, even though it doesn't feel like it. fares have been falling since the 1980s. i want to you listen to travel expert mark murphy. here are some of the benefits of this merger. >> this merger will provide the traveler with better connections. i thin
. lawrence seaway. he created nasa, which led the way to the kennedy years in going to the moon. barack, the federal troops to protect school girls going to school and dealing with the implementation of brown. the virtues of eisenhower were quite strong. n a thirdhave won third to term. host: this from twitter. guest: well, of course, depending on how you look at things. some people vote for the lesser of two evils. many dreamed for a third party s.at never quite cohere the leader roosevelt had a party -- theodore roosevelt had a party because people did not want to vote for taft or wilson. he could not win with a third party. george wallace grabbed a hold of the south. h. ross perot got 19% of the vote. there are times enough people say, i cannot vote for either of these guys any third-party movement starts coherent but they usually only get so far. host: what about the role of congress at the time of the president's second term? this comes from twitter from sharonb. guest: well,look. there is truth to that. you have to have a president that is willing to do business. bill clinton made
saw something strange in the sky last night, a streaking flash of light. nasa tells us it could have been another meteor or some sort of space debris burning up as it entered the atmosphere. fortunately, nobody was hurt in california. >>> some new details about christopher dorner's last moments. an autopsy showed the former l.a. cop died of a single gunshot to the head. they say at this point it looks like it was self-inflicted. dorner locked himself in a cabin that caught fire during the final standoff with police. >>> a new pope before easter? could pop. pope benedict xvi will step down at the end of the month. current rules make march 15th the earliest possible date to pick a new pope but the vet kat says the date could be pushed up if all of the cardinals make it to rome early for a vote. >>> weary passengers from a carnival cruise ship "triumph" today are adjusting to being back on dry land with running water and working toilets. the passengers finally departed the crippled ship early friday in mobile, alabama, the more than 4,200 passengers and crew were then taken to new orlea
katrina, sandy reshaped the coastline and devastated homes, businesses and lives. nasa says the evidence shows humans are contributing to global warming. still, the realities in washington test the bounds of how we as a nation respond. in his state of the union address, the president told members of congress that if they don't act, he will. >> eye will direct my cabinet to come up with actions we can take to reduce pollution, prepare communities for climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy. >> last year president obama rejected a permit to build the keystone pipeline. but democrats are torn between a base of supporters who strongly oppose the project and the potential business boom by adding thousands of new jobs into the work force. that permit now rests in the hands of the state department, and secretary john kerry, who in august suggested climate change is as dangerous as iran, nuclear weapons, and war. now, on february 8, kerry met with canada's foreign minister, and he promised a fair, transparent and prompt decision on that. i don't know. it's
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)

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